Paradise Lost book 2/The Passion question

The way Jesus Christ is depicted in “The Passion” and book 2 of Paradise Lost seems to differ in some intriguing ways. In both pieces, Milton does refer to Jesus as the descendant of God; however, the significance of Jesus’ presence changes. The third stanza of “The Passion” describes Jesus as follows: He sov’ran Priest stooping his regall head [ 15… Read more Paradise Lost book 2/The Passion question

Paradise Lost, Book 1: Political underpinnings?

The first book in Milton’s Paradise Lost jumps around a lot geographically. There are first references to numerous locations in the Middle East with biblical significance, which fall in line with the way the narration touches on various events from the Bible. Later on, however, there are references to Britain, Armorica, and a few other… Read more Paradise Lost, Book 1: Political underpinnings?

American Moor pt. 2 Reflection: It’s Definitely a Reclamation

After discussing the section that made me ask whether American Moor aims to either reclaim or commandeer Othello, I have concluded that it definitely reclaims it.  While it is true that Shakespeare wrote Othello without regard for how it could impact Black actors and viewers, and that white scholars have historically assumed authority over Shakespeare’s… Read more <em>American Moor </em>pt. 2 Reflection: It’s Definitely a Reclamation

American Moor pt. 2 Question: Is It a Reclamation?

Keith Hamilton Cobb uses the latter half of American Moor to share what motivates him to pursue the role of Othello.  Much of his lines are dedicated to reframing Othello as a character through which Black American traumas can be represented.  If reevaluated thoughtfully and executed skillfully, Othello could evolve from its archaic, socially inapplicable… Read more <em>American Moor</em> pt. 2 Question: Is It a Reclamation?

Othello, Act 4: Regarding Imposed Sexism

Act 4, scene 3 closes with a dialogue between Desdemona and Emilia in which they discuss how Desdemona could best address Othello’s rage.  In the conversation, Desdemona recites a song about infidelity that she had learned from her mother’s maid.  After finishing it, she asks Emilia the following question: “O these men, these men!  Dost… Read more Othello, Act 4: Regarding Imposed Sexism