EN 2490: Rethinking Modern British Literature, 1660-1945

Course Schedule, Spring 2021

Week 1: Tuesday, February 2nd

In class:

On WordPress: 

  • Write a 300-word personal perspective on disability.

In  about 30-60  minutes,  describe  something  that  is  important  to  you.  This  “something”  could  be  anything from your major (nursing) to a hobby (cooking) to a favorite pastime (watching sports) that you enjoy doing or learning about. If you’re an English Education major, for instance, you might write about what specifically attracts you to the field — do you have a family member who is a teacher? Are there particular aspects of the field that inspire you? Be sure to organize your  writing  into  paragraphs,  include  vivid  detail,  and  make  the  significance  of  your  interest(s)  clear.  

Take  a  few  minutes  to  generate  ideas  and  organize  your  thoughts  before  you start writing. I encourage you to select something to write about that is related to broader social issues in contemporary America, especially issues related to disability, the theme of our course. You  may  continue to  address  today’s  topic  throughout  the  semester  in  various  forms

Some  examples  of  contemporary  social  issues  related  to disability include (but are not limited to): accessibility; addiction; anxiety; class; COVID-19; crime; depression; diversity; drug legalization; education; gender; gun violence; healthcare; homelessness; mass shootings; poverty; the prison system; race; sexuality; social media; stereotypes; suicide; and veterans.

Post these to our shared WordPress website (brit.lit.nrhelms.plymouthcreate.net) categorized as “Questions and Reflections Spring 2021.” This will count as your Week 1 post.

Week 2: Tues, Feb 9th

Before class: 

In class (synchronous) and on our course site (asynchronous): 

Mel Gibson, 1990, To be or not to be (3:46)

Ethan Hawke, 2000, To be or not to be (2:49)

David Tennant, 2009, To be or not to be (3:02)

Ian Holm, 1990, To thine own self be true (0:45-2:15)

Bill Murray, 2000, To thine own self be true (2:42)

Oliver Ford Davies, 2009, To thine own self be true (2:45-4:30)

Helena Bonham Carter, 1990, Ophelia’s Act 4 Madness, (3:30)

Julia Stiles, 2000, Ophelia’s Act 4 Madness (1:01)

Week 3: Tues, Feb 16th

Before class:

Week 4: Tues, Feb 23rd 

Before class: 

In class: 

On WordPress: 

  • If you haven’t already, sign up for an online Teams text-chat conference for next week here.
  • If you haven’t already, start drafting your First Project.

Week 5: Tues, Mar 2nd NO CLASS

Instead, sign up for an online, one-on-one conference here. Instructions are at the link. 

Before our meeting:

  • No weekly questions due this week!
  • Read Barker and Murray’s “Introduction: On Reading Disability in Literature”
  • Get as much work done on your rough draft of your First Project as you can. You don’t need to be done, but the more you have finished, the more we can discuss.
    • Optional: read They Say / I Say, 43-52

Friday, March 5th: First Project due. 

Week 6: Tues, Mar 9th

No Class on Tuesday! Campus holiday.

Instead of class:

On WordPress: 

  • Instead of our usual Weekly Reflections and Questions, this week you may instead write a response reflection to one or more student projects. The same goes for your comments: you may post your four comments on student projects rather than on weekly posts.

Week 7: Tues, Mar 16th

Before class:

Week 8: Tues, Mar 23rd

Before class:

In class:

  • Discuss Disability as Simile or Metaphor 

Week 9: Tues, Mar 30th

Before class:

After class:

  • If you haven’t already, start drafting your Second Project.
  • If you haven’t already, sign up for an online Teams text-chat conference for next week here.

Week 10: Tues, Apr 6th NO CLASS

Instead, sign up for an online, one-on-one conference here. Instructions are at the link. 

Before our meeting:

  • No weekly questions due this week!
  • Get as much work done on your rough draft of your Second Project as you can. You don’t need to be done, but the more you have finished, the more we can discuss.
    • Optional: Read They Say / I Say, 91-100

Friday, April 9th: Second Project due. 

Week 11: Tuesday April 13th

Before Class:

On WordPress: 

  • Instead of our usual Weekly Reflections and Questions, this week you may instead write a response reflection to one or more student projects. The same goes for your comments: you may post your four comments on student projects rather than on weekly posts.

Week 12: Tuesday April 20th

Before Class:

  • Read Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea, 86-171 [cn: ableism, domestic violence, racism and racist language, rape, suicide]
  • Sylvia Plath, “Ella Mason and her Eleven Cats” pp. 233-4 (1956)
    • Optional: read They Say / I Say 101-30

On WordPress: 

  • If you haven’t already, start drafting your Third Project.
  • If you haven’t already, sign up for an online Teams text-chat conference for next week here.

Week 13: Tues/Thurs, April 27th NO CLASS

  • No weekly questions due this week!
  • Sign up for an online, one-on-one conference here. Instructions are at the link. 
  • Get as much work done on your rough draft of your Third Project as you can. You don’t need to be done, but the more you have finished, the more we can discuss.

Fri, Apr 30th: Third Project due. 

No Final! We’re done.

  • Instead, Finals Week is Revision Week. Late work accepted and given feedback through May 6th.